Technical Information

Mary Martin Diary Project
Transcription and Encoding Documentation

Introduction
The Mary Martin diary is part of the collection of the National Library of Ireland (NLI). The goal of this project is to transcribe and encode the digitised pages of the diary and then to digitally exhibit the project on TCD servers. The purpose of the project is to allow increased access to the diaries for a general audience interested in the social and military aspects of Ireland in 1916. As this project entails working with the framework of the Diary of Robert Graves 1935-39 website, the encoding has been tailored to align itself with their TEI tags as far as is possible:

Transcription
Each word has been transcribed as it appears on the digitised page. Spelling has not been regularized or corrected. Punctuation has been captured as it appears in the original other than the following exception. Mary Martin’s constant use of a dash to indicate a full stop have been replaced during the transcription with a simple full stop. If words are thought to be missing, they have not been replaced.

TEI Header
The header mirrors for the most part the header of the Diary of Robert Graves 1935-39 project. The TEI P4 rules utilised by the Graves project are used as is their DTD. The header contains the catalogue information from the NLI for the Mary Martin diary, the name of the encoder and transcriber of that monthly entry, the availability information for the digital object as detailed by the NLI.

<?xml version=”1.0″ encoding=”UTF-8″?>
<!DOCTYPE teiCorpus.2 SYSTEM “gravesdiary.dtd”>
<teiCorpus.2 id=”entries1916″>
<teiHeader>
<fileDesc>
<titleStmt>
<title>Diary of Mary Martin, January to May, 1916</title>
<author>Martin, Mary, 1866-1955</author>
<respStmt>
<resp>1 May – 2 May, 1916 transcribed and encoded by</resp>
<name>Patrizia Rebulla</name>
<resp>3 May – 25 May, 1916 transcribed and encoded by</resp>
<name>Gordon O’Sullivan</name>
</respStmt>
</titleStmt>
<publicationStmt>
<publisher>National Library of Ireland</publisher>
<address>
<addrLine>Kildare Street</addrLine>
<addrLine>Dublin 2</addrLine>
<addrLine>Ireland</addrLine>
<addrLine>http://www.nli.ie/</addrLine>
</address>
<publisher>Trinity College Dublin. This project was part of the M.Phil in Digital Humanities and Culture supervised by Dr. Susan Schreibman</publisher[G1] >
<address>
<addrLine>College Green</addrLine>
<addrLine>, Dublin 2</addrLine>
<addrLine>Ireland</addrLine>
<addrLine>http://www.tcd.ie/</addrLine>
</address>
<availability>
<p>Reproduction rights owned by the National Library of Ireland. Details of seeking permission to reproduce are here: http://www.nli.ie/en/rights-and-reproductions.aspx</p>
</availability>
<date>2012</date>
</publicationStmt>
<sourceDesc>
<p>National Library of Ireland Manuscript No: MS 34,256A.: Diary of Mary Martin, of Monkstown, Co. Dublin, written while her son Charles was missing and wounded on the Salonika front, 1916 Jan.-May.
</p>
</sourceDesc>
</fileDesc>
</teiHeader>
<TEI.2 id=”diary-1916-05″>
<teiHeader>
<fileDesc>
<titleStmt>
<title>Diary entries for May, 1916</title>
</titleStmt>
<publicationStmt>
<p/>
</publicationStmt>
<sourceDesc>
<p/>
</sourceDesc>
</fileDesc>
</teiHeader>


TEI Body Format

Within the body element is a <div> tag, marking sub-divisions within the text body.

<body>

                <div type=”diaryentry” n=”1916-05-01″>

In the diary text, each entry has a heading with the date of that entry. The value “diaryentry” is used for all diary text. In the diary, each entry has been marked with: <div type=”diaryentry” n=”year-mo-day”> type names the form of text to follow, n precedes the date value, which is used to identify the text:  <div type=”diaryentry” n=”1916-05-02″>

There is a running header after the <div type> containing date of diary entry:

<head><fw><pb n=”2″/></fw>Wednesday, 3 May, 1916</head>

Further within the <div> section the <p> tag is used for encoding paragraphs and approximating as closely as possible the author’s original paragraphing. This is the smallest unit of text that the Martin diary project is encoding:

<p>Went up to <rs type=”place” key=”PLA86″>Kingstown</rs> after breakfast very<lb/>

As each diary transcription will be displayed beside the digitised image, it is important to have exactly similar line breaks. The tag <lb/> is used to ensure a mirroring of the two:

<p>Since I heard you were missing as well<lb/>                                                            as wounded , it has occurred to me to write<lb/>                                                       the diary in the form of a letter. We hope<lb/>

Names, Places and Events

Persons, locations and organizations mentioned in the diary are tagged with a <name> tag and a type attribute attached to it in the form of <name type=”person”> or <name type=”location”>. An example of the use of these referring strings is

<rs type=”organization” key=”ORG24″>London &#38; Westminster Bank</rs> for <rs type=”person” key=”PER94″>Marie</rs>, tried<lb/>          to get <rs type=”person” key=”PER30″>Connor</rs>to drive as far as <rs type=”place” key=”PLA26″>Clyde Rd</rs>.<lb/>

This usage follows as before the format of the Robert Graves diary.

The names and notes about these persons, locations and organizations are held in a separate References XML file with a specific key code attributed to each, e.g. for Marie Martin, PER94

Emendations

There are few misspellings in the diary but where there are obvious ones, they are marked with the <sic> tag. This is used with the ‘corr’ attribute to reassure the reader that this is not a faulty transcription, e.g.:

 

but rather shaken by their <sic corr=”nervewracking”>nerveracking</sic> ex &#8212;<lb/>

Mary Martin does use some abbreviations, and where she does the word has been placed in <abbr> tags, and the full word which has been abbreviated has been included in <expan>.

to the <rs type=”place” key=”PLA24″>Club House Hotel</rs> &#38; found <abbr expan=”although”>altho</abbr><lb/>

Notes

The <note> element is used in the diary encoding primarily for explanatory notes of terms and events which are not otherwise captured in the References XML file. An infrequent use of the element is to provide a translation for foreign words and expressions where required:

<rs type=”person” key=”PER94″>Marie</rs> spoke to the CSM <note> Company Sergeant Major Sergeant major is the senior non-commissioned soldier in a company responsible for administration, standards and discipline. In combat, his prime responsibility is the supply of ammunition to the company. </note>

Entities

Punctuation that requires entities is limited to ampersands and dashes; they are replaced using ISO values. Dashes are characterised as &#8212; and ampersands of which Mary Martin uses a lot are represented as &#38;

Met <name type=”person” key=”UC1”>Uncle Charlie</name> &#38; <name type=”person” key=”AM1”>Auntie</name> &#8212; Horribly wet &#38; <lb/>

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